Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord

With an old town featuring rows of perfectly-kept white wooden homes, a picturesque harbour and lively waterfront, it’s no wonder Stavanger is a popular spot for those visiting Norway. But its proximity to one of the most spectacular fjords and biggest tourist attractions in the country is the real draw, making the historic city a perfect spot for visitors to base themselves while exploring the dramatic Lysefjord.

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord

Stavanger’s harbour

Located in the southwestern part of Norway, the 42 kilometre fjord which translates to ‘light fjord’ is home to idyllic islands, countless waterfalls, tiny farms nestled in the hillside and wildlife including birds, seals and mountain goats.

While there is plenty worth exploring in the area, the most famous attraction is undoubtedly Pulpit Rock (Preikestolen), a plateau that juts out of the mountain a dizzying 604 metres above the sea. Nearly 300-thousand people make the trek each year from May through October, and incredibly enough are permitted to walk right out onto the ledge—if they dare. The result is an unbeatable view of the fjord stretched out below, along with epic photo-ops.

Pulpit Rock as seen from above. Courtesy of Shutterstock

Pulpit Rock as seen from above. Courtesy of Shutterstock

The Pulpit Rock hike takes about eight hours round trip from Stavanger after accounting for a ferry and bus ride to get to and from the base, so those tight on time (read: day trippers) might not be able to squeeze in the adventure. Fortunately there’s another way to see Preikestolen—albeit from below—by booking a sightseeing cruise from Stavanger.

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord

A luxurious way to explore the Lysefjord

For an exclusive experience private boats are available to charter, but most people simply book a cruise with Norled. The ferry company offers daily excursions during the high season, which includes commentary in several different languages. Their boat departs from Skagenkaien in Stavanger’s main harbour, and for around $50 per person visitors can enjoy a nearly three hour tour of the Lysefjord from the comfort of the cabin or out on the sundeck. It’s important to note that it can be very windy on the deck once the boat gets moving, so guests are encouraged to hold on tightly to their hats!

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord
Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord The trip starts off by passing gorgeous, uninhabited, rocky islands dotted with vibrant foliage and surrounded by sparkling, sapphire-hued water. Wooden houses with rooster-red roofs are nestled into the hillsides behind, and every curve in the coastline reveals a new idyllic scene.

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord
Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord The mountains then begin to appear in the distance, with some rising as high as three-thousand feet above sea level. The cliffsides on the granite formations are so steep that only mountain goats are sturdy enough to scale them, and visitors may be lucky enough to spot some of the cheeky fellows who clamour toward the water’s edge as the boat nears, bleating at the crew in hopes they’ll be kind enough to toss them some food scraps.

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord
Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord Norway is no stranger to waterfalls, and it’s no different in the Lysefjord where there are so many that one quickly loses count of how many they’ve passed. The falls gush out of the craggy rocks, creating a striking scene as they pour down into the sea.
Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s LysefjordOne of the more notable stops on the tour is Vagabond’s Cave (Fantahålå), a gorgeous cove where dramatic cliffs surround an aqua-marine pool. As legend has it, the cave was named after a group of vagabonds who hid in the shelter for months trying to escape police—and based on the spectacular scenery, it’s not hard to see why they chose this spot to hunker down in.

Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord

Vagabond’s Cave

Just beyond the cave is the main attraction and final stop on the cruise: Pulpit’s Rock. The craggy ridge juts out overhead, its rectangular plateau reaching out toward the sea. From the water it’s impossible to see the daredevils nearing the ledge, but easy to understand the allure of making the trip up. While the view of the Lysefjord from above simply can’t be beat, an afternoon spent cruising through the spectacular waterway is an incredible, memorable way to explore the scenery around Stavanger.
Cruising from Stavanger to Pulpit Rock through Norway’s Lysefjord YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY:

The best spots for photography in colourful Stavanger, Norway

Spectacular surprises on a fjord safari in Flåm, Norway

A scenic ride up Norway’s famous Flåm Railway—then cycling back down!

The differences between a Viking River and Viking Ocean cruise

Why scenic Mount Fløyen is the best hike in Bergen, Norway

SHARE THE PINSPIRATION! CLICK THE IMAGE BELOW TO PIN:
Highlights of a fjord cruise from Stavanger, Norway including famous Pulpit Rock Globe Guide explored the Norwegian fjords in collaboration with Viking Cruises and Norled. As always, hosts have no editorial influence over articles.

You may also like...

19 Responses

  1. Beautiful imagery! I’m sure a sightseeing cruise is a fantastic way to make the trip to Pulpit Rock. Would have visited Norway a long time ago if the country wasn’t so expnsive!

  2. Natasha Amar says:

    Such spectacular scenery and that photo of Pulpit Rock is amazing! Great video by the way.

  3. Oh wow, what a beautiful part of the world! Bookmarking this. Thanks for sharing 🙂

  4. Mar Pages says:

    Norway looks amazing! Beautiful video, really calming. 🙂 There’s something about waterfalls thats really soothes me.

  5. Megan says:

    Such a beautiful way to see the country. And I love just about any excuse to be out on the water.

  6. anna says:

    Norway has always been one of those places that just look unreal. Would love to go. So many places to see and points of interest in that beautiful country.

  7. anto says:

    I’ve done a fjord cruise in Geiranger Fjord and absolutely loved it. It gives the landscape a totally different dimension, watching the high walls of the fjord all the way from down below…

  8. Hannah Finch says:

    I have love hearts in my eyes for the waterfall and Vagabond’s Cave! I’d love to do a cruise like this, will keep it in mind when I eventually visit Norway. 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

  9. karla says:

    Wow, you have really great pictures. It makes me want to go here now.

  1. January 2, 2017

    […] Copenhagen, explore a Viking graveyard in Denmark, and finish off our trip by cruising through the Norwegian fjords. I’ve been lucky enough to visit some pretty extraordinary places in my lifetime, and can say […]

  2. March 27, 2017

    […] that made its riches from the oil industry is nestled amongst the breathtaking fjords, and is the gateway to famous Pulpit Rock which is considered one of the most breathtaking views in the […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1.9K Shares
Share1.7K
Pin199
Tweet34
+19
Stumble